A Las Vegas swindler

Discussion in 'Casino Reviews' started by TDVegas, Dec 13, 2019.

  1. TDVegas, Dec 13, 2019

    TDVegas

    TDVegas Member

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    Beware. Mark Georgantas has a gambling system.

    The 53-year-old “professional gambler,” who promotes himself under the tawdry alias “Pure Cash,” insists he’s discovered the secret on how to beat casinos at their own game. He claims to have won huge profits at blackjack, baccarat, craps, and roulette. Moreover, the spoils of his secret systems have been shared with an elite clique of privileged investors.

    Pray tell, how do I get in on the action?

    Lucky for us, Georgantas is generous. According to multiple gambling websites and user posts made at various online forums, he’s been marketing his betting systems as intellectual property of several private investment companies. He’s claims that one his firms, “Monster Gaming Entertainment LLC,” would earn $250 million in profit on a $700,000 investment. Another of his companies, “Monster Intellectual Holdings LLC,” was projected to earn $400 million on a mere $50,000 investment. But his crown jewel in the bustling financial empire of the imagination was something called “Monster Gaming Products LLC, which would earn back a whopping $4 billion on a $250,000 investment. Not prone to idleness, he’s also the self-appointed president a company called “21 Matrix, Inc.,” although no one is quite sure exactly what the company produces (other than victims, perhaps).

    Georgantas has been trolling victims throughout Nevada and California in recent years looking for suckers while pulling off all sorts of different scams, many connected to gambling. According to a Jan. 17, 2016 story about Georgantas which ran in the Las Vegas Review Journal:


    “He never explained exactly how he won, but he promised that selling his system could make $3.9 billion alone. He could pull in another $400 million with a reality TV show, a movie, books, merchandising and a player for hire….He name-dropped George Clooney and Matt Damon as clients. He said he had worked for the CIA. He claimed he attended Princeton University, where he researched spectroscopy, the study of the interaction between matter and electromagnetic radiation. Most important, he always walked out of a casino with a profit.

    Hey, if George Clooney and Matt Damon are clients, then deal me in. Where’s my checkbook?

    With billions in profits awaiting potential investors, Georgantas isn’t averse to helping out the little guy every once in a while. Consider the story of a potential mark who confided in Georgantas that he was desperate for money and needed to make enough money for en expensive knee operation for his mother. Under the headline, “One time deal for mom” Georgantas insisted he could return significant profits at no risk. [SEE FOOTNOTE BELOW FOR FULL TEXT]

    According to sources, he’s badgered emailed his prospective clients begging for investment capital. He’s even brazenly attempted to sell something he refers to as his secret “Biggins Craps System” to fellow gamblers while actually standing at the tables at casinos in Las Vegas, Mesquite, Laughlin, and Primm. Unfortunately, no audio or visual evidence exists of Georgantas hitting up the assorted truck drivers and anonymous tourists known to frequent the low-stakes craps tables in Primm. But if something does surface, somewhere, I’d sure as hell love to see him work his sales pitch.

    In written correspondence to potential clients, Georgantas claims he’s willing to share his gambling knowledge — for a fee. One $10,000 investment package is referred to as his “absentee bankroll” system. How fitting. You fork your money over to Georgantas, while he does all the “work.” Yeah, he’ll do quite a job with your money, alright. You won’t even have to leave home, or break a sweat. He promises a payback of $1,000 a day in profits over the first 30 days. He also gives clients his “personal guarantee.” Have no fear. His gives his personal guarantee is “in writing.” He calls this his “pc.”

    Then, there’s the more conventional option, where Geograntas teaches you his secret system personally, which you can use to profit on your own, as you please. His sales pitch includes this gem, posted verbatim from one of the emails sent to one of his targeted victims:

    “Talk about living the dream. Where else can you fall out of bed, go downstairs to a table, win, and go to cashier? No employees, no boss, no inventory, no hassle. Pure cash, baby!”

    If testicles were tossed into a fruit salad, Mark Georgantas would have balls the sizes of cantaloupes.

    Incredibly, there are still plenty of gullible people out there who fall for this sort of thing (including me, as readers very well know based on one experience many years with a con man named “Peter Falcone”).

    In the two most-recently reported cases, Las Vegas residents Marcelo Caraveo and Evan Rodich were swindled out of a grand total of $350,000. In the first alleged incident, Caraveo sold his Las Vegas house a few years ago and was left with a tidy sum of cash. He hoped to invest that money somewhere and make a profit. That’s when he met Georgantas through a mutual friend. That turned out to be a costly introduction, indeed.

    Sometime later, Rodich was playing craps one afternoon at The Quad when he couldn’t help but notice Georgantas standing along the rail tossing bundles of casino chips all over the felt, while making quite a loud scene. The two gamblers struck up a conversation. He listened attentively to Georgantas’ while he made his gambling system sales pitch, boasting that he won all the time and was making his investors a fortune (meanwhile, no one working at The Quad seemed too concerned by the prospective threat of massive losses).

    Both Caraveo and Rodich later testified to grand juries about their dealings with Georgantas. Each signed written contracts. One of the terms read as follows: “No matter what losses are generated the investor will receive all of his money back.” Satisfied that they were fully protected, next they turned over most of the life savings to Georgantas.

    Once they gave Georgantas their money, he disappeared.

    Boy, that really sucks. I hate it when that happens.

    Turns out, promising something, taking money under false pretenses, and then disappearing with the loot is a serious crime. Convinced they’d been swindled, Caraveo and Rodich went to legal authorities and explained how they were defrauded. A warrant was immediately issued for Georgantas’s arrest. That’s when they were shocked to discover are far more sinister profile about the slimeball who was discovered to have used several aliases during his various marketing campaigns, including “Mark Gigantis,” “Mark G.,” and “Mr. Smooth.” But his best-known moniker was “Pure Cash.”

    A background check revealed that Georgantas has an extensive criminal record in California. They also learned that he once served time in state prison. He even escaped from jail once, and ran out of a courthouse while on trial in another instance.

    Indeed, “Mr. Smooth” may be true to his name — which is about the only credible thing on Georgantas’ resume. Incredibly, he once escaped from jail through a storm drain back in 2003, in a scene right out “The Shawshank Redemption.” According to a newspaper account of the story, he joined another inmate and escaped from the jail while serving a one-year sentence for conspiracy to defraud, grand theft, and violating probation. He was later arrested after stealing a car while making his escape.

    In another dubious incident, he fled the Orange County (CA) courthouse on foot in the midst of his own trial. He left his attorney standing alone at the defense table inside the courtroom, who was left speechless about what had occurred. The story goes — in 2009, while being tried by a jury for grand theft, Georgantas requested permission to go to the restroom. Then, while unsupervised, he somehow sneaked away and fled the building. He made it outside and fled on foot. He was later captured and served time, since the jury had came back with a “guilty” verdict — in abstentia. Georgantas must have seen the writing on the wall, and decided to take his chances going on the lam.

    Following his stint in prison, Georgantas was released and eventually moved to Las Vegas. Lucky us. That’s when the “professional gambler” turned into a pitchman for various gambling schemes.

    By 2013, Georgantas had created a brand new identity for himself. He totally changed his appearance, dying his hair and often wearing shades indoors. His new career had began.

    Mark Thomas Georgantas, aka “Mr Smooth” aka “Pure Cash” appeared to be on a lucky streak, at least for a while. He found a few suckers here and there on the way to his first $ billion. He even caught at least two whales in his web of deceit. But as all gamblers know, lucky streaks eventually come to an end. The odds finally catch up, and they caught up to Georgantas. His luck finally ended. He crapped out. Seven out. Line away. Pay the “don’t.”

    No telling if Georgantas was a “don’t pass” bettor, but that would have been the play.

    On March 23rd, 2016 Georgantas was spotted inside the Hard Rock Cafe Casino in Las Vegas, where was detained and arrested. He was taken into police custody, where now presumably he awaits serious criminal charges and likely faces more time incarcerated — hopefully a very long time.

    At least for the time being, Georgantas appears to have swindled his final victim. But a few years from now, who knows? Where there’s a sucker, there’s a swindler ready to take his money.

    As for his last two victims, Marcelo Caraveo and Evan Rodich, they must wonder what happened to their money. Very likely — here it is, on the rail of a Las Vegas craps table, used for bait to lure in more victims. “Pure Cash” posted this photo on his Facebook page, which looks to be quite a huge sum of money. Where it went, only one man knows, and that’s “Mr. Smooth.”

    And the end story....9 to 20 years courtesy of the Nevada prison system. Happy hunting.

    https://www.reviewjournal.com/crime...-stole-over-400k-sentenced-to-prison-1678641/
     
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  2. KokomoJoe4, Dec 16, 2019

    KokomoJoe4

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    Wow,

    While I was aware of his many other multi-faceted skills, I had no idea that Mr. Smooth is a Princeton educated spectroscopist.

    Did a bit of undergraduate research in that field in my college days, where I first became aware of LID's reputation in this discipline.

    Smooth's one time deal for mom is touching.
     
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  3. Liman

    Liman Member

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    its amazing to me that someone who lives in las vegas, sells his home and hands over the cash to someone.
    I mean, the guy lives in vegas, he sold a home, so he wasn't living in a cave off in the desert somewhere.
    would that guy actually buy the Brooklyn bridge if someone approached him with a contract for it?
     
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  4. KokomoJoe4, Dec 16, 2019

    KokomoJoe4

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    TDV and other old timers here,

    You have read Smooth's posts here, and I'm sure have seen like I that he can't even put a coherent statement into print.

    IOW, he reads like both a shyster and an idiot.

    People have got to be REALLY gullible to have to dealt with him.
     
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  5. TDVegas, Dec 16, 2019

    TDVegas

    TDVegas Member

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    Yep. I don't get it. I don't understand it. It's out of my world.

    The only thing that comes to mind is never underestimate the stupidity of the public and there's a sucker born every minute. There also has to be an innate greed factor....aka, thinking easy money.

    The CEO of MGM....Jim Murren. You would think this is a man on the top tier of $$ smarts, would never get swindled. Well, he was to the tune of $1.6 million in some convoluted winery fiasco in New Zealand. His story is a bit different...but nevertheless, he was taken for $1.6 million by a shyster.

    With the NFL picking contest...I've been doing some investigating on these paid sports handicappers. You would not believe how many people are paying these guys money every month for their selections. Are they truly handicapping? Doubt it. Are they any good? Doubt it.

    People still sign up and willfully fork over money to them. The thought "why aren't these guys just betting their picks and making money themselves"....never enters their mind? We have been saying the same about the dice coaches.

    With names like "Ace"...."King of Wagering"...."The Dominator".

    I'm like you guys...I don't get it. It's the Wild West out here and there are plenty of suckers in line willing to fork over cash to these guys.
     
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  6. Liman

    Liman Member

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    I don't know what deal murren got ripped off , but investing in some winery or business is nothing at all like someone telling you they have a unbeatable system to beat a casino.
    common sense dictates that casinos aren't going to tolerate any of that. someone tells you they figured out how to overcome a casino edge and win 10 million dollars with a 20 thousand dollar investment? really? the 10 billion a year the casinos spend on preventing just this sort of thing some individual has figured it out, and is now willing to sell it? really, doesn't anyone with half a brain say, hey, why doesn't the guy go work in fast food industry for one year, save 10 grand, then use his own money and take down all the casinos. easy peasy.
    I mean, come on, how gullible or stupid does one have to be to believe any of that shit.


    speaking about losing money on a winery deal, wasn't there an episode in the sopranos devoted to the restaurant owner borrows 50 thousand dollars and gives it to the French womans brother who claims he has the licensing rights to a great wine? or vodka? so like a schmuck, he hands over 50 grand to someone because he wants to bed his sister, only to find out the guy took his money and claimed the business venture failed.
    still not like giving money to someone with a gambling system.
     
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  7. KokomoJoe4, Dec 16, 2019

    KokomoJoe4

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    Ah yes, you are speaking of restauranteur Artie Bucco, who then got his ass kicked when he went to try to rough up the guy who took his money.

    LID will fondly remember Artie's wife Charmaine.
     
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  8. TDVegas, Dec 16, 2019

    TDVegas

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    Artie Bucco.

    Classic episode. Ralphie knew it was a suspect deal when he told Artie he was passing...."I can't hurt you when you don't pay me back".

    An inebriated Tony, who also probably knew better...was caught in a moment of weakness. Gave him the 50k. Then had Furio chase the debt.
     
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  9. lone irish digit, Dec 16, 2019

    lone irish digit

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  10. TDVegas, Dec 16, 2019

    TDVegas

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    Classic mobster move when Artie cries to Tony how he’s going to pay him back the 50k.

    “well, Artie....you’re already late so technically it’s more than 50k”

    LOL.
     
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  11. TDVegas, Dec 16, 2019

    TDVegas

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  12. Liman

    Liman Member

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    Charmaine's latest role, she is the wife of joe pesce's character in the movie the Irishman.
     
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  13. random_roller, Dec 16, 2019

    random_roller

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    Many of the people who are consistently good at handicapping sporting events probably work for the casinos and/or don't need to solicit clients.
     
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  14. The Midnight Skulker, Dec 16, 2019

    The Midnight Skulker

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    But, but, wealth beyond measure is guaranteed--IN WRITING by guys...
    What risk could there possibly be?
     
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  15. von duck, Dec 16, 2019

    von duck

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    Real guys that can "write" huh? :confused: Count me in. :)
     
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  16. The Midnight Skulker, Dec 17, 2019

    The Midnight Skulker

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    Good catch. Who'd a-thunk Mr. Smooth, who looks like he just dropped out of a tree in the Review Journal article, could write? Come to think of it, who'd a-thunk anyone could get close enough to him to hear his pitch without self-contained breathing apparatus?
     
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  17. Mssthis1, Dec 17, 2019

    Mssthis1

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    It's amazing the scams that some people will fall for if "easy money" is involved.

    When I was still in the factory, pre internet days, one of the fellow supervisors fell for the chain letter scam.

    He sent away $500 and then when his mailbox wasn't stuffed full of envelopes with $500 in them a couple weeks later he made his second mistake, he told someone in the shop. Soon the whole plant knew. lol.

    That's one of the reasons those scams work. Often times the victims are too embarrassed to tell anyone they fell for it.
     
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    Last edited: Dec 17, 2019
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