Bulldogging Versus PSO'S

Discussion in 'Advanced Craps' started by tabletop123, Aug 5, 2014.

  1. tabletop123, Aug 5, 2014

    tabletop123

    tabletop123 Member

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    Ok, Here's a Question for the Math Buffs. What is the Percentage of the Point being made the Very next roll after being established , versus a Point Seven out? I have no fricking Idea how to calculate this. What say You Math buffs?
     
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  2. Morgue, Aug 5, 2014

    Morgue

    Morgue Member

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    The odds of rolling a seven immediately after the come out roll is 1 in 6. The same as it is for any other roll. This is 16.67% of the time
     
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  3. obie1

    obie1 Member

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    tabletop123:

    This is one of the great mysteries that has been plaguing "mankind" since the beginning of time.... .:( ;) :)

    Just kidding..., The answer is:

    It depends on what number is the come-out point:

    If the come out roll is a:

    6... The chances of the next number being a 6 is (5 divided by 36) = 13.89%

    5... The chances of the next number being a 5 is (4 divided by 36) = 11.11%

    4... The chances of the next number being a 4 is (3 divided by 36) = 8.33%

    Ditto for (sister) numbers (8, 9 & 10)

    ...and of course the chances of the very next roll being a 7 out (after point has been established) is (6 divided by 36) which = 16.67% .

    Best Wishes,

    Obie1



     
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  4. tabletop123, Aug 5, 2014

    tabletop123

    tabletop123 Member

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    Thanks, Obie 1.
     
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  5. basicstrategy777, Aug 5, 2014

    basicstrategy777

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    The number of possible combinations that can form the point(s) in question is the numerator of a fraction whose denominator remains fixed at 36.

    To take this a step further, to figure out the odds the next roll will be either a 4,5,6 , we see that there are 3 ways to make a 4...4 ways to make a 5.....and 5 ways to make a 6. Adding the total number of ways to make the 3 points together gives 12......which means the odds are 12 over 36 or 1 in 3.

    In gambling we state the event NOT happening first so the odds in the above example is 2 to 1 against......or 33.3 %.

    777
     
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  6. tabletop123, Aug 5, 2014

    tabletop123

    tabletop123 Member

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    Thanks, BS777. Appreciate the input!
     
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  7. SevenOut, Aug 6, 2014

    SevenOut

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    Obie1 and 777 are providing the percentages, but left out the important part of your question.

    "What is the Percentage of the Point being made the Very next roll after being established , versus a Point Seven out?"

    And maybe it should be Odds and not Percentages you want to follow more closely.

    The Seven Out does not change. BUT depending on the point and since you consider the 2, 3, 12 and the other numbers, other than the point number you have an interest, each point number on the next roll will vary... considerably. Someone would have to spend some time to work that one out for each number 4/10. 5/9 and 6/8.

    I can tell you from experience... I do not see a Point and Winner on the next roll happening much. I do "remember" the Point and Seven Out on the next roll.

    Someone with a lot of time on their hands could work out the numbers and they would be very interesting. 777 is computing the way John Scarne would, which I would consider a better way to look at your math problem.
     
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  8. tabletop123, Aug 6, 2014

    tabletop123

    tabletop123 Member

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    Yeah, seven-Out, That PSO is a real BankRoll depleting B---h. Even though the 7 comes 16.6% of the time on any given roll, It seems like the first roll after the point is the most damning. At least from a Psychological standpoint. LOL It's rough when you get the engine started, Only to have the Vehicle "Stall Out" as soon as You press the accelerator. Such is the game of Craps! LOL
     
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  9. SevenOut, Aug 6, 2014

    SevenOut

    SevenOut Member

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    tabletop123: "LOL It's rough when you get the engine started, Only to have the Vehicle "Stall Out" as soon as You press the accelerator."
    *****
    We haven't invented a vehicle yet, so you are way over my head, which is not too difficult when I am 5 foot 4 inches.
     
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  10. $nakeEye$, Aug 6, 2014

    $nakeEye$

    $nakeEye$ Member

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    A move that my team uses in order to prevent the devastation of a PSO event is to simply -

    Turn your PLACE bets OFF until the shooter throws a BOX NUMBER after EACH C/O Roll -

    Does NOT prevent a loss to 7-OUT AFTER that -

    BUT definitely minimizes Bank Roll damage caused by a PSO -

    REGARDLESS - when it occurs !

    $...eE..$
     
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  11. tabletop123, Aug 6, 2014

    tabletop123

    tabletop123 Member

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    SnakeEyes, You get a BIG Amen to that!!! That fist Point Cycle roll CAN be a Killer.
     
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  12. basicstrategy777, May 23, 2018

    basicstrategy777

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    There you go again ya-ya....digging up the past...loveya.

    777
     
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  13. Mssthis1, May 23, 2018

    Mssthis1

    Mssthis1 Member

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    Don't forget that you also have a 1 in 6 chance of rolling a horn number. That is the fly in the ointment that often screws up peoples calculations.
     
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  14. yacraps, May 26, 2018

    yacraps

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    basicstrategy777 said:
    The number of possible combinations that can form the point(s) in question is the numerator of a fraction whose denominator remains fixed at 36.

    To take this a step further, to figure out the odds the next roll will be either a 4,5,6 , we see that there are 3 ways to make a 4...4 ways to make a 5.....and 5 ways to make a 6. Adding the total number of ways to make the 3 points together gives 12......which means the odds are 12 over 36 or 1 in 3.

    In gambling we state the event NOT happening first so the odds in the above example is 2 to 1 against......or 33.3 %.

    777
    I remember it well..... right back at cha ;)
     
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  15. Twelve4s, May 27, 2018

    Twelve4s

    Twelve4s Member

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    You just need a new vehicle. It’s called a James Haul,

    E19FC853-A20F-4504-A035-60270BA7AB23.jpeg
     
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