Navy destroyer in Sea of Japan: A sideways collision or more fake news?

Discussion in 'Offtopic Lounge' started by Settingcanthurt, Jun 17, 2017.

  1. Settingcanthurt, Jun 17, 2017

    Settingcanthurt

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    By Brian C. Joondeph
    Yesterday's news, aside from the usual Trump obstructing, colluding, and making money on his investments, included a ship collision. As described by ABC, a "Navy destroyer collides with container ship off coast of Japan." NBC had a similar headline: "Navy destroyer collides with ship off Japan."

    Fox News worded their headline a little differently: "US Navy involved in collision." As did CNN saying, "Navy destroyer collision off Japan."

    It was a terrible accident, as U.S. sailors are missing and potentially injured or worse, but my point is regarding the choice of words describing what happened.

    The dictionary definition of "collide" is "to hit something violently." Something hits something else. A verb. Seems straightforward. The word "collision" is a noun, an event that occurred. Not clear is what hit what.

    Two of the above-mentioned stories uses the word "collision," which is clearly what happened yesterday. Two other stories used the word "collide," meaning one ship hit the other ship. The headlines, by saying the U.S. Navy ship collided with the Japanese container ship, imply that the Navy ship hit the container ship.

    What do the pictures say? This first photo is of the U.S. Navy destroyer.

    [​IMG]

    The second photo is of the Japanese cargo ship. Both photos are courtesy of the Associated Press.

    [​IMG]

    Seems the cargo ship had bow damage while the destroyer was smashed along its side. Given that ships move in a forward direction, not sideways, isn't it fairly obvious which ship hit the other one? In a car collision, if one car had front bumper damage and the other had side door damage, it would be clear which car hit the other.

    Wording is important. Sky News ran a headline, "USS Fitzgerald collides with cargo ship." NPR says, "Navy destroyer collision with merchant vessel." The verb versus the noun. One assigning fault, the other not.

    There will be plenty of time to assign cause and blame in this tragic accident, but how hard is it to accurately report what occurred without implying cause that is contradicted by the photos?

    Maybe I'm being picky here, but given the proliferation of fake news, this caught my attention. Words are important and carry implications. Remember George Zimmerman as the "white Hispanic"?

    It's Donald Trump's Navy now. If the Navy does wrong, it must be Trump's fault. For some media outlets, the reporting bias is that the blame must somehow flow to him. Much like how CNN blames him for the Alexandria baseball field shooting this week.
     
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  2. badddoin, Jun 17, 2017

    badddoin

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    You just see conspiracies everywhere. I've listened/read/watched several articles on this, and I haven't heard anyone (but you) mention Trump.

    There are maritime rules just like traffic rules. It has to do with which vessel is approaching from which direction. I don't recall all the particulars, and I'm not remotely interested in looking them up. I'm sure we'll be hearing about them soon enough.

    I does seem amazing to me, though, that this could even happen. I'm absolutely sure that the Navy vessel was equipped with state-of-the-art navigation equipment, and I don't think it's a stretch to think the container ship was as well. Having said that, I think it's fair to say that SOMEONE was at fault.

    My most sincere condolences to the families of the sailors.

    Also my thoughts are with whoever caused this, assuming it was an accident. S/he'll have to live with this from now on.
     
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  3. Onautopilot, Jun 17, 2017

    Onautopilot

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    What? I had to go back and make sure who posted this...at first I thought it might have been BTL as I struggled through it! :)
     
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  4. Onautopilot, Jun 17, 2017

    Onautopilot

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    There could be other circumstances, but the rules for vessels at sea are pretty universal.

    The ship approaching on your starboard side has the right of way. If you see the red light on the ships bow off to your right, you become the give way ship.....radar , and navigation equipment, also designed to give this same potential collision evasion action.

    There may be other contributing factors, and I am certain the Maritime Board will sort it all out. But looking at the picture of the navy ship, it appears to have been hit on it's starboard side, meaning the cargo ship was to its starboard, and the navy ship should have been the give way vessel, if that's the case....but like I said, there are other consideration that might influence the outcome.

    The above photo doesn't show the whole ship, but it appears by the pumping water flow as it hits the sea, that the bow is to the right, and the ship is moving in that direction, meaning we are looking at the starboard side.

    If you get hit on the starboard side, you are usually at fault...inland waterways as well. That does not excuse the right of way ship from not taking evasive action though And both ships are required to have visual look out at all times while underway...not the most desired billet aboard ship.

    I pray for the families and the shipmates, of those that died or were injured. That is all that's important right now. The details will get sorted out later.

    Just a quick layman's observation of what is available here.....definitely not judging anything.
     
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    Last edited: Jun 17, 2017
  5. random_roller, Jun 19, 2017

    random_roller

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    Very sad for the loss of life and injuries. Seems like somebody was asleep on the job or just messed up, perhaps on both ships. We're not talking about trying to spot (and avoid) a kayaker on the open seas. These are both decent-size vessels. Hard to imagine the 30K ton container ship was highly maneuverable, though. They're just not built for that type of movement. And one would think a US Navy destroyer would be much more nimble and be able to avoid a collision.
     
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